Plants – Friends of Mount Majura

Wildflower Walk (15/10/2017)

 Events, News, Plants, Walks and talks  Comments Off on Wildflower Walk (15/10/2017)
Sep 252017
 

Scrambled Eggs, Goodenia pinnatifida  (W. Pix)

Explore the wildflowers that are blooming this season on a stroll with local ecologist Michael Doherty. Enjoy the beauty of the Mount Majura reserve, its grasses, trees, and views whilst you go and learn about the different species found in the grassy woodlands and open forest of Mt Majura.
When: Sunday, 15th October 2017, 2.00 pm to 4.00 pm
Where:
Meet at the Antill Street Nature Park entrance opposite Carotel, south of The Fair in North Watson, click on this map to view the meeting point.

Wear suitable clothing for the expected weather, and comfortable and appropriate footwear.
Bring sun protection, a camera and magnifying glass if you have them.

An updated plant species list of Mount Majura / Mount Ainslie will be available for a gold coin donation.

Enquiries:secretary@majura.org
Download this poster for promotion of the event.

Endangered Hoary Sunray, Leucochrysum albicans, northwest slope of Mt Majura (Photo W. Pix).

View Mount Majura’s Floriade. Visit FoMM Flickr galleries with pictures of flowering orchids, forbs, shrubs

Sep 302016
 
Glossodia major at Mount Majura - 24 Sep 2014

Wax lip orchid, Glossodia major (W.Pix)

Enjoy Mount Majura’s Spring Floriade at this delightful walk on Sunday, 23 October with local plant ecologist Michael Doherty and learn about the different species found in the grassy woodlands and open forests of the nature reserve.

When: Sunday 23 October 2016, 2 – 4 pm
Where: meet at the nature park entrance Mackenzie Street roughly opposite Grayson Street, Hackett (click on this map)

Please bring good walking shoes, water, sun protection, a camera and a hand lens / magnifying glass if you have one.

A new flora list will be available for a donation.

Enquiries: secretary@majura.org

Poster

Jul 292016
 
Tree Walk 20160724_150222

Michael pointing out a Brittle gum (M. Pouwer)

Report by Thomas Brereton with some closing remarks by Max Pouwer.

On Sunday 24 July a group of intrepid aspiring botanists braved a looming hailstorm to follow Michael Doherty through the grassy woodlands and open forests of Mt Majura. Luckily the weather cleared as we set out into the Blakely’s Red Gum/ Yellow Box (Eucalyptus blakelyi/ E. melliodora) woodlands encircling the base of the mountain.

In addition to identifying these dominant eucalypts, we learned the characteristic flakey bark of the Apple Box (E. bridgesiana), the large sickle shaped phyllodes of the Hickory Wattle (Acacia implexa) and the delicate foliage of the climbing Small Leaved Clematis (Clematis leptophylla).

Scribbly gum bark (W.Pix). View photographs of Mt Majura trees at this photo gallery.

Crossing the powerline trail and climbing up to the stony western face of the mountain, the dominant eucalypt species shifted to the Scribbly Gum (E. rossi), on which Michael pointed out the distinctive dark scribbles left by burrowing larvae, and the flesh-like pressure ridges in the folds under the branches.

Tree Walk 20160724_150432

Walking through Red Anther Wallaby grass (M. Pouwer)

The groundcover of grasses switched from a herbaceous carpet to dense tussocks of red anther wallaby grass (Rytidosperma pallidum) interspersed with frequent Urn Heaths (Melichrus urceolatus), Nodding Blue Lily (Stypandra glauca) and Bitter Cryptandra (Cryptandra amara).

As we walked northwards, Michael demonstrated the dusty bark of the Brittle Gum (E. mannifera), to differentiate it from the similar adjacent scribbly gums. We passed a stand of Black Cypress Pine (Callitris endlicheri), which Michael explained were unable to recover from fire unlike the surrounding eucalypts. The cypresses were distinguished from the nearby superficially similar parasitic Cherry Ballarts (Exocarpus cupressiformis) by their woody cones and the distinctive pine like odour of the foliage.

Female Drooping She-oak with seed cone and flowers (W.Pix)

Reaching a creek gully, we climbed up a damp gully through a stand of Bundy Box (E. goniocalyx), which was difficult to distinguish from Apple Box without examining the juvenile leaves, buds or fruit. After passing through forest dominated by the needle leaved Drooping Sheoak (Allocasuarina verticillata), we climbed up the main ridge of the mountain to reach a stand of Kurrajong trees (Brachychiton populneus) planted in 1920.

Snow gum flower buds and fruits (W.Pix)

Near the summit, Michael pointed out the final eucalypt species of our walk, the smooth barked Snow Gum (E. pauciflora), restricted to only the highest areas of the mountain. With sunset approaching, we enjoyed the view over the Canberra plains under the gathering clouds while wandering down the mountain. 

Despite the challenging weather including a brief hail fall and temperatures hovering around 5 C, we had a record turnout of 33 interested people, including a number of young people. This was great to see!

Tree walk 20160724_152956

Flowing streams on Mt Majura (M. Pouwer)

A notable feature was the free flowing water streams which we have not seen a lot of in the normally dryer forests and woodlands of Mt Majura.

The exceptional rainfall we have had in this winter season during June and July has recharged the frequently dry creek beds and should bode well for the spring flowering season this year.

Judging by the chorus of Frog song in evidence, our little Amphibian friends should also do well this winter and spring, capitalising on the extra rain.

 

Jun 272016
 

Scribbly gum (W. Pix)

Enjoy a winter walk through Mount Majura’s beautiful woodlands and forests on Sunday 24 July. Learn to identify local trees, see where they occur and find out how they survive fire and drought.

When: Sunday 24th July 2-4pm
Where: Meet at Nature Reserve car park, Mackenzie St near Grayson St, Hackett (view this map).

Local ecologist Michael Doherty will lead this medium grade informative walk along the Casuarina trail. Walk up to the snow gums then back down to the Black Cypress forest.

Bring: Sturdy shoes, water, warm clothes, and a gold coin donation for a tree guide.
No bookings required.
Enquiries: secretary@majura.org or phone 0408 429 214

Download this poster to promote the walk.

View photographs of Mt Majura’s trees and their distinguishing features at this tree gallery.

Read Michael Doherty’s essay on Eucalypts and Wattles

Brittle gums (S. Bittinger)

Sep 302015
 
2015-09-27 17.03.31

Hoary Sunrays 2015

Join local plant ecologist Michael Doherty for a wildflower ramble in the nature reserve behind the Watson Fair on Sunday 25 October and enjoy a spring Floriade on the mountain.

This delightful walk will highlight different species found in grassland, woodland and open forest.
Please bring good walking shoes, water, sun protection, and a hand lens/magnifying glass if you have one.
A new flora list is available for a donation

When: 25th October, 2-4pm.

Where: Meet close to the nature reserve entrance Tay St / Ian Nicol St at The Fair, North Watson; see volunteer registration point on this map

Contact: 6248 8955 or secretary@majura.org

Sep 292015
 

Rosy Hyacinth Orchid, Dipodium roseum (S. Bittinger)

Mount Majura is home to a number of rare and endangered plant species. What are they and where are they? Join experts on Sunday 18 October to find out and learn how to register them on Canberra Nature Map. Information from surveying the presence and abundance of rare species will guide the management of the reserve.
When: Sunday, 18 October, 2pm to 4pm
Where: Meet at the nature reserve entrance Mackenzie St close to Grayson St, Hackett; view this map.
Bring: Sun protection, sturdy shoes, drinking water and a camera or iPhone. Please bring your Rare Plant Survey kit if you have one from previous surveys.
Get ready to register your first plant: iPhone owners can download the Canberra Nature Map App which is a quick and very easy way to contribute sightings to the Canberra Nature Map. An Android app is in the works and will be ready soon.  But anyone with a camera or camera phone with GPS capability can snap a picture and upload it to the Canberra Nature Map website.  Have a look at the website to see what other plants have been seen in the Canberra nature reserves.
Inquiries: secretary@majura.org
Help promote the survey: upload this poster.

About Canberra Nature Map

Late Mauve Doubletail, Diuris dendrobioides (M.Doherty)

Canberra Nature Map is a repository for park care groups, volunteers and members of the public to report sightings of rare and endangered plant species and any of the many treasures that Canberra’s nature parks are home to.

Canberra Nature Map provides readily accessible and up-to-date spatial data of uncommon and endangered plant species. This information enables a precautionary approach to be taken towards the management and protection of critical habitat within our reserves.

Canberra Nature Map was founded by Aaron Clausen, a mountain biker who accidentally rode through a patch of critically endangered Canberra spider orchids and became entranced by their beauty and fragility.

With your help, we aim to:

  • Accurately map rare plants and maintain records for future generations;
  • Improve public education and awareness of the plant diversity and the significance of Canberra’s Nature Park;
  • Influence development decisions and protect Canberra’s treasures by providing critical species location data to Government.
Jan 202015
 
Clustered Everlasting Chrysocephalum semipapposum seeding rs DSCN6422

Seeding Clustered Everlastings (W.Pix)

The seed crop of Clustered Everlastings, Chrysocephalum semipapposum is at peak. If you have an hour of spare time in the morning of either Friday or Sunday please come along and help harvesting.
When: Friday, 23rd January 10-11am, and/or Sunday, 25th January 10-11.30am.
Where: Meet at nature park entrance at The Fair, intersection Tay St and Ian Nicol St, North Watson.
Bring: Sun protection, good shoes.
Enquiries: Waltraud at 6247 7515

The perennial forb Clustered Everlasting is one of the few ground cover species that is not grazed by kangaroos and rabbits. We use the species to re-vegetate degraded sites that have a high presence of herbivores such as the grassy woodland behind The Fair in North Watson, the Majura paddock and the old sheep camp at Mt Majura’s ridge.

Clustered Everlastings Chrysocephalum semipapposum

Nature’s Floriade on a summer day: Clustered Everlastings on Mount Majura (W. Pix).

 

 

Sep 212014
 

Blue Bell flower (S. Bittinger)

Explore the wildflowers that are blooming this season at this delightful walk with plant ecologist Michael Doherty.

See the different species found in the grassland, woodland and open forest. Enjoy the beauty of nature, the grasses, trees, and views whilst you go.

When: Sunday, 26th October 2014, 2.00 pm to 4.00 pm

Where: Meet at the Kellaway St nature park entrance close to Phillip Ave, Hackett; click on this map to see the meeting point.

Parrot-pea (W.Pix)

Bring and Wear: Sun protection, water, sturdy shoes and a camera if you have one.

An updated Flora list will be available for a gold coin donation.

Enquiries: email secretary@majura.org or ph. 0488 218 784

Download this poster for promotion of the event

Sep 042014
 

Rare plant Five corners, Styphelia triflora (W.Pix 07.03.2014)

Mount Majura Nature Reserve is home to a number of rare and endangered plant species, some endemic to the ACT and some at their range distribution limit in the Territory.

What are they and where are they?

Join Dr. Michael Mulvaney, ACT Conservation, Planning and Research for a survey of Mount Majura’s rare plants.

When: Sunday, 19 October 2014, 10am – 12noon

Where: Meet at nature park entrance Antill Street roughly opposite of Carotel, North Watson; view this map

Bring and wear: sun protection, sturdy shoes, water, something to write, and a camera if you have one.
Some survey kits will be provided; the kits include a list of rare plants recorded within or in the vicinity of the Mount Majura nature reserve.
Inquires: e-mail secretary@majura.org or ph. 6247 7515

Download this poster for promotion

Information from surveying the presence and abundance of rare plants within the nature reserve will guide management, planning, development and conservation decisions. For instance the finding of protected plant species at the Majura paddocks had been considered important for the decision to return the paddocks to nature reserve.

Pictures of some of the listed rare plant species are available at Canberra Nature Map and the Rare Plant Gallery.

Prickly Moses, Acacia ulicifolia (W. Pix 06.07.2014)

Aug 192014
 

 

Snow gum flower buds and fruits (W.Pix)

Enjoy a gentle and informative walk on the slopes of Mount Ainslie with local ecologist Michael Doherty.
Learn how to identify local woodland and forest trees, see where they occur and hear how they survive fire and drought.
When: Sunday, 31 August 2014, 2.00 – 4.00pm
Where: Nature park entrance, Kellaway St car park close to Phillip Ave, Hackett; view this map.
Wear and bring: Sturdy shoes, sun protection, and drinking water.
Tree guides are available for a gold coin donation.
Enquiries: phone 6248 8955

Snow gum leaf with parallel veins (W.Pix)

Read about The Eucalypts and Wattles (Michael Doherty, August 2012)

View some features of eucalypts and other trees in this tree picture gallery.

The walk is jointly hosted by the Friends of Mount Majura and the Mount Ainslie Weeders parkCare groups.